— Care is… by Natsumi Sakamoto

Care is everywhere, but invisible and therefore only recognisable through words.
Care is all the “attention” that sustains our life and our environment.
Care means keeping a continuous attention on others. It means taking responsibility for the condition of others as if it were your own.
It is very ‘hard to see’ when you are in an environment where you take it for granted that care will be provided.
Without the word “care”, all kinds of everyday labour might not be recognised as labour. The small invisible labour is done by someone else and is hidden to those who do not always do it.
When I started this session, I thought of care as referring to care work – the work we do for specific people who need care. And I’ve focused on thinking about the problems of it being so fixed in gender roles, that is, so biased towards women’s roles. Since I mainly experience care work such as child-rearing and housework in my life, in our session I wanted to ask the main question about why the burden of care work is still exclusively on women in even today’s society.
The word ‘caring’ means to be concerned or worried about the people around you. The word ‘caring’ has a long history of being associated with femininity and motherhood, and is considered to be a nature of women. For this reason, there is still a strong belief that care work is a woman’s job. Care work, which does not create value in a market economy, was considered women’s work under the patriarchal system and therefore undervalued.
The reality is that care work is still often carried out by vulnerable groups, mainly women and migrants.
Carol Gilligan’s ethics of care shed light on the experiences and thoughts of women that had not previously been examined. It was an attempt to give recognition to care work, which had previously been seen as mere ‘self-sacrifice’, by seeing it as another ethic, based on responsibility to others. In Gilligan’s assertion that “being a feminist begins with the need to make unheard voices heard,” she stressed the importance of women speaking with their own voices, which had been forgotten in society.
We have listened to and shared voices from Japan, the UK and elsewhere in this session. There have been moments of a kind of ‘solidarity’ where we have all brought ‘similar’ experiences to the table. But what was also interesting to me was the sense of ‘difference’ and ‘diversity’ of our individual experiences. The more I listened to each of them, the more it became clear to me that even if we were talking about the same “childcare” issue, we had different circumstances and different perceptions of the problem.
When I thought about why there is so much diversity in the experience of care, it seemed to me that it is fundamentally because the experience of care is ‘personal’.
In general, there is a view that the personal is ‘inferior’ to the public.
This is because society is built on the standard of the ” independent and healthy male “, and therefore it is difficult to accept diversity.
So, I believe that the difficulty of talking in public about things like caregiving and raising children, where each person has a very different experience and perspective, is due to society’s “intolerance of diversity”.
I felt the possibility of trying to gather together in the same space ( virtually) and listen to each other, while sharing these “differences”. I also felt the importance of creating a situation where people are not talking about the same “goals” or solutions, but just getting together and listening. I also thought it was important to question the tendency towards Westernisation, especially when engaging in transnational dialogue. This is because too often we talk about some singular theory, such as feminism, as a norm or goal. Perhaps this challenging attempt to create tolerance for diversity in the public sphere is what care represents itself.

ケアについて
ケアとは、その言葉によって(ようやく)認識される、私たちの生命と環境を維持するための、あらゆる「配慮」のこと。他者を注視し続ける状態を保ちながら、他者の状態を自分のことのように捉え、責任を持つこと。
それは、提供されることが当たり前の環境にいる場合、非常に「見えづらい」もの。
ケアという言葉がなければ、日常のあらゆる労働は、労働と認識されないのかもしれません。小さな見えない労働は誰かによって行われていて、それをいつもやらない人にとっては見えないのです。
私はこのセッションを始めるとき、ケアというのは、ケア労働のこと、つまりケアが必要な特定の人々へ行う労働についてのことを指すと考えていました。そして、それが性別役割に固定されたもの、つまり女性役割に偏っていることの問題点について考えることを重視してきました。私が主に実生活で経験しているのが、子育てや家事労働といったケア労働なので、現代においてもなお女性にばかりケア労働の負担がかかる社会のあり方について主に問いかけたいと思いで、このケアというテーマに向き合いました。
英語のcaringの日本語訳は「配慮する」であり、周りの人を気遣う、心配する、という意味を持ちます。この「配慮」というのは、「女らしさ」や「母性」と関連づけられ、女性が自然に持つ性質であるとされた歴史があります。そのため、ケアに関わる仕事は女性の仕事であるという認識が、今もなお残っています。市場経済の中で価値を生み出さないケア労働は、家父長制のもとに女性の仕事とされ、それゆえに過小評価されてきました。
今も立場の弱い人々、主に女性や移民の人々が多くを担う現実があります。
キャロル・ギリガンが主張したケア倫理は、それまで省みられてこなかった女性の経験や思考に光をあてました。これまで、単なる「自己犠牲」としてみなされてきたケアを、他者への責任に基づいた、もう一つの倫理として捉えることで、ケア労働に正当な評価を与える試みでした。「フェミニストであることは、聞かれなかった声を 聞こえるようにする必要から始まる」というギリガンの主張では、これまで、社会の中で忘れられていた女性たち自身の声で語ることの大切さを訴えています。
私たちは、このセッションで日本と英国、その他の国々から寄せられた声を聴き、共有してきました。そこでは、私たちが「似たような」経験を持ち寄って話しているという、ある種の「連帯」を感じさせられる瞬間もありました。しかし、私が興味深かったのは、同時にそれぞれ個人の経験の「差異」と「多様さ」を実感させられたことです。それぞれの話を深く聞くほど、たとえ同じ「子育て」の話をしていても、異なる環境、問題や意識を抱えていることが、明らかになる場面もありました。
なぜ、ケアの経験に「多様さ」が在るのかということを考えると、それは根本的に、ケアの経験が「パーソナルなもの」だからなのだ、と思いました。一般的にパーソナルなものは、公的なものよりも、「劣ったもの」だとする考え方があります。それは、社会が「自律した健康な男性」を基準に作られており、そこは似た者同士で構成されている、基本的には、多様性を受け入れづらい環境だからです。そのため、介護や子育てというような、それぞれが全く異なる経験と視点を持つことについて社会という公の場で語ることの難しさは、社会が持つ「多様性への不寛容さ」、に在るのではと思います。
私は、この「違い」を共有しながらも、同じ空間(バーチャル)に集まり、声を聞くという試みに可能性を感じました。そして、同じ「目標」や解決策に向かって人々が話し合うことではなく、ただ集い話を聞くという状況を作ることの重要さを感じました。特にトランスナショナルな対話を行う場合は、それが欧米主義的なものである可能性を問いかけることも大切だと思いました。フェミニズムなど何か一つの理論を基準やゴールとして語ってしまうことが多々あるからです。多様さを受け入れる寛容さを公の場で作り出すこと、この難しい試みが、ケアそのものを表しているのかもしれません。

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: